Desserts/ Recipes

Dutch Stroopwafels

These amazing Dutch stroopwafels consist of a thin layer of caramel syrup in between two waffle cookies. You won’t be able to resist the sweet treat!

Dutch stroopwafels in a stack.

When it comes to kitchen appliances I like to keep things simple. As long as I have a blender, mixer, waffle iron, and pressure cooker I’m good.


But this last week, I decided to purchase a new appliance that doesn’t exactly have a lot of purposes. I simply needed to have it.

It was a waffle cone iron…that I swore I’d never buy. But I’ve been dying to share one of my favorite treats with you: Dutch stroopwafels. And you simply need to have a waffle cone iron to make the treat (I guess I could use it to make some actual waffle cones for homemade gelato as well!).

An overhead shot of Dutch stroopwafels.

If you’ve never heard of Dutch stroopwafels, or “syrup waffles”, they are made with two thin layers of baked dough with a caramel syrup filling in between. You may have seen them at Walmart or Costco before, but obviously, those ones aren’t nearly as good as a freshly-made stroopwafel.

Ever since I had a real, warm, ooey-gooey stroopwafel in The Netherlands a couple of years ago, I’ve wanted to share this recipe with you so that you can enjoy this delicious goodness as well!

I’ll admit, I always thought Dutch stroopwafels would be super complicated to make, but as long as you have waffle cone iron you’re good to go.

A stack of Dutch stroopwafels with caramel drizzled on top.

Now traditionally, you would slice the waffle in the middle so that you have two thin waffles and you’d put the caramel syrup in between them.

But…let’s just say I tried slicing waffles twice and failed miserably both times, so I decided to make things simple for myself and just use two of the waffles without slicing them instead (patience when it comes to baking and cooking is tough when you’re pregnant!). So if you have a trick for slicing the waffles, let me know. The stroopwafels are certainly thicker this way, which means you may want to cut them in half and share them with someone if you don’t want to have a crazy sugar overdose.

It’s time to pull out the waffle cone or pizzelle iron (yes, you can use this too!) that’s been gathering dust in your cupboard, and start making some homemade Dutch stroopwafels! I can guarantee you’ll have a hard time resisting these sweet treats.

A stack of Dutch Stroopwafels.

Other desserts that you’ll love!

Dutch Stroopwafels
Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
2 hrs
 

These amazing Dutch stroopwafels consist of a thin layer of caramel syrup in between two waffle cookies. You won't be able to resist the sweet treat!

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Dutch
Keyword: caramel, cookie, dessert, dutch, stroopwafel
Ingredients
Waffle
  • 4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter melted
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 4 1/2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt
Caramel Filling
  • 2 Tbsp water
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 6 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • dash of salt
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add in all of the ingredients for the waffles. Attach the dough hook and combine and knead the dough until smooth. The consistency should be similar to that of cookie dough. Once the dough is well-kneaded cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 45 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, heat the water, sugar, butter and corn syrup in a small saucepan over medium heat until the sugar dissolves, stirring constantly. Bring the mixture to a boil. Add the cinnamon, salt and vanilla and continue boiling until the syrup reaches the "soft ball stage" (234°F-240°F on a candy thermometer). This should only take a couple of minutes. Remove the saucepan from heat and allow to cool for 10 minutes.

  3. After the dough has finished resting, preheat and grease a waffle cone or pizzelle iron. Set the temperature to a medium setting. Knead the dough and divide it into small balls, roughly the size of tennis balls (you can adjust the size if you find they are too big). Place a ball of dough on the preheated iron and slightly flatten it. Cook the waffle until steam no longer escapes and it has turned a golden brown.

  4. Carefully remove the cooked waffle from the iron. Use a round cookie cutter to cut off the edges for a perfectly circular waffle. While the waffle is still hot, gently split the waffle with a serrated knife (you can skip this step if you find it easier). Continue the process until all of the waffles are cooked and split.

  5. Spread 1 to 2 tablespoons (more or less depending on your preference) of the caramel filling on one of the waffles and top with another waffle. Repeat with the rest of the waffles.

  6. Serve the waffles with a hot drink. Store in an air-tight container for up to one week.

Recipe Notes
  • Adapted from SprinkleBakes and King Arthur Flour.
  • Since I chose not to split the waffles, I was able to make about 10 stroopwafels. If you are able to split the waffles, you'll be able to make around 20 stroopwafels.
  • If not eaten fresh, stroopwafels taste great warmed up in the microwave for a couple of seconds. They are also traditionally placed on top of a hot drink, with the steam from the drink helping to warm them up.
Pinterest pin for Dutch stroopwafels.
Pinterest pin for Dutch stroopwafels.
Pinterest pin for Dutch stroopwafels.